New Zealand says no plan to prosecute British DJ over Covid breach

New Zealand Says No Plan To Prosecute British Dj Over Covid Breach

New Zealand says no plan to prosecute British DJ over Covid breach: WELLINGTON: New Zealand’s federal government said Monday it would not request British DJ Measurement to be prosecuted for breaking Covid isolation rules and creating an Omicron infection scare.
The electronic music artist, genuine name Robert Etheridge, stated he had misconstrued the guidelines when he blended with individuals prior to getting a final unfavorable test result.
“The Ministry of Health does not plan to refer this case to the police at this stage,” the ministry said in a statement.
“The ministry needs to stabilize the deterrence effect from any potential prosecution with allowing an environment that does not dissuade future cases from assisting with the public health reaction to Covid-19,” it stated.
Etheridge said Thursday he was “devastated” to discover that he had actually evaluated positive for Omicron after emerging from 10 days of seclusion including three days at his residence.
The DJ supposedly stopped working to wait on an unfavorable outcome from his last test taken on day nine of seclusion, as needed, prior to heading out into the community. He had actually landed in New Zealand on December 16.
“To my shock and huge issue, I suddenly received a favorable test on day twelve, 2 days after my isolation duration had actually ended,” he stated on his Instagram page.
Etheridge stated he had actually received “lots of comments of hate and abuse” following media reports of the event.
“I wish to restate my apologies to those who I have unintentionally endangered as a result of my misconceptions.”
There have actually been no reported Omicron cases connected to Etheridge’s getaway, according to New Zealand media reports.
Etheridge withdrew from an organized appearance at a three-day music festival, Rhythm and Alps, which was held from December 29-31 on New Zealand’s South Island.
New Zealand, which has stringent quarantine rules for global arrivals, reported Monday 137 brand-new Covid infections for a total of 13,883 given that the pandemic began, with the death toll the same at 51.

Released at Mon, 03 Jan 2022 07:04:41 -0500

A medical scan exposes the secrets of New Zealand’s extinct marine reptiles, nearly 150 years after the fossils’ discovery

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New Zealand’s fossil record of land dinosaurs is poor, with simply a few bones, but the collection of ancient extinct marine reptiles is exceptional, consisting of shark-like mosasaurs and long-necked plesiosaurs.
Plesiosaurs first appeared in the fossil record around 200 million years earlier and passed away off, alongside dinosaurs, 66 million years earlier.
They are best understood for the fanciful but appealing concept, suggested by British scientist Sir Peter Scott, that the legendary Loch Ness beast was in fact a plesiosaur that in some way outlived all other huge reptiles and stayed undetected throughout human history.
In a current research study task, we used medical CT imaging to scan plesiosaur fossils gathered in New Zealand back in 1872.
The scans expose a new level of detail, validating that plesiosaurs swam mostly with their heads down, in contrast to the Loch Ness animal, and revealing a close link between the New Zealand fossils and South American specimens from 70 million years back.
In 1872, the Canterbury Museum director Julius von Haast employed self-taught Scottish geologist Alexander McKay to undertake geological surveys and gather fossils.
Von Haast had actually heard that explorer and amateur researcher Thomas Cockburn-Hood had actually discovered considerable reptile fossils in the upper Waipara Gorge, in the Canterbury area.
Cockburn-Hood described the location as “the saurian beds”, and we now understand the marine sediments maintained fossils from 70 million years ago.
McKay went to the Waipara during the winter of 1872, and he was marvelously effective, gathering numerous partial skeletons of marine reptiles and numerous bones.
Among this material were two rather unimpressive, compressed, semi-spherical groupings of bones. These beinged in Canterbury Museum’s storage places, unidentified and stuck inside the concretions they were excavated in, for over 120 years.
It would take till the late 1990s to understand the significance of the fossil. Museum preparator and famous fossil collector Al Mannering and his associates prepared these two unloved fossils, breaking away the stone to expose the bones included in the rocks.
Checking out English scientist Arthur Cruickshank thought these fossils were remarkable and perhaps comparable to plesiosaur material he had seen from South America.
In 2004, Canterbury Museum’s geology curator Norton Hiller and Mannering published a paper, in which they suggested the 2 groups of bones, the size of soccer balls, were in fact the two sides of the skull of the exact same animal – one extremely comparable to plesiosaurs from South America.
In 2014, worldwide prominent marine reptile specialists Rodrigo Otero (Universidad de Chile) and Jose O’Gorman (Argentina’s Museo de La Plata) checked out New Zealand and examined the specimens. They concluded Hiller and Mannering were right.
The 2 halves were undoubtedly from the same animal and the Waipara fossil was most comparable to a group of plesiosaurs hitherto just understood from Chile and Argentina.
They described the Canterbury Museum specimens completely and provided them the scientific name Alexandronectes zealandiensis, Latin for Alexander’s swimmer from Zealandia.
Science and innovation proceed and O’Gorman’s team wished to confirm the evolutionary relationships of Alexandronectes zealandiensis, utilizing the latest innovations.
In 2019, I took the two fossils to medical facility to be CT scanned, utilizing the current double energy CT scanners at St George’s radiology in Christchurch. The results were extraordinary, revealing formerly unseen functions of the anatomy.
Without the CT scanning innovation, these details could just have actually been seen by damaging the fossil.
We examined the animal’s inner ear and concluded, based upon the orientation of the ear, that it preserved a posture where its head was constantly held either perpendicular to the body or just a little listed below the body (not like Sea serpent fans would keep, up in the air like a sock puppet).
We also saw a feature understood as the stapes, likewise unseen in plesiosaurs up until then. The stapes is a small umbrella-shaped bone in the middle ear which transmits vibrations from the eardrum to the inner ear.
This work enabled us to conclude that Alexandronectes zealandiensis was an uncommon plesiosaur.
It belonged to a special group of southern-hemisphere plesiosaurs now called the Aristonectinae. This group belonged to the Plesiosaur family referred to as elasmosaurs. They were the last experiment in plesiosaur advancement, with the longest necks of all plesiosaurs.
Released at Mon, 03 Jan 2022 05:51:29 -0500

New Zealand says no plan to prosecute British DJ over Covid breach

New Zealand says no plan to prosecute British DJ over Covid breach

New Zealand says no plan to prosecute British DJ over Covid breach

New Zealand says no plan to prosecute British DJ over Covid breach

New Zealand says no plan to prosecute British DJ over Covid breach

New Zealand says no plan to prosecute British DJ over Covid breach

New Zealand says no plan to prosecute British DJ over Covid breach

New Zealand says no plan to prosecute British DJ over Covid breach

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